Does your organisation suffer from PILES?

General discussion on all aspects of the IT Infrastructure Library (ITIL)
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YorkshirePudding
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Wed Feb 10, 2010 4:43 am

PILE’s - Projects Into Live EnvironmentS – Otherwise known as Service Transition. Poorly transitioned projects are a major cause of failed ROI, missed targets, backouts, emergency changes, emergency releases, Incidents & Problems. The solution is obvious, establish a Service Introduction process that integrates Project Management & Service Management teams and their respective activities. The resistance to this is mind-boggling…….Why?
Is it a failure by senior management to recognise the problem?
Is it resistance from Team Managers who want to keep “busy” and to maintain the status quo, protecting the empires they have spent years building?
Is it that there is such a focus on delivering Business Change that the Utility & Warranty of that Change is secondary to just getting “something” delivered?
Is it perceived as “too big an issue to tackle”?
These are excuses/rationales that I have heard used to avoid tackling the problem.
What are your thoughts on this?.......should a cure be sought or should it continue to be treat like hemorrhoids i.e.a pain in the butt, not talked about, smothered in cream and causing obvious discomfort?
In Yorkshire we have a penchant for telling it like it is. It is a serious question but let’s not lose sight of some humour in our industry.
:D


Best Regards,
Terry
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Olitil
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Fri Feb 12, 2010 5:41 pm

Haha I agree with your observations Terry. Probably a mixture of all the reasons you mentioned but I have observed that people in very reactive environments feel protected by that very fact. It makes life easier as they are not accountable for their ineptitude. I say this as being a very inept but somewhat agile IT'er in a previous life.

If they can avoid governance by saying "I am too busy" without being required to evidence it with resource plans and gantt charts then as soon as the Boss or the project manager puts something across the bows for the team to take on it is the standard response.

The fact is they probably are too busy, on the wrong activities. Effective team leaders do not, IMHO always do the fixing but enable a strong and effective team by managing the capacity of the team, ensuring it has the skills and abilities to deliver and preventing "feral" projects or "favours" from distracting from the milestones.

In reality, they enjoy pissing about with databases/switches/servers all day whilst the team sorts itself out based upon an unspoken heirarchy usually centered around who has been there the longest.

There is no problem with the methodology. People do not like to be managed. Full stop. The problem is leadership I think.

Effective leaders develop strategies to enable results by addressing this. Another topic.

And I know the Yorkshire approach is an effective strategy. Tell it like it is. But it depends on the culture. It takes a brave man (or effective Leader) to take on the culture of an organisation. But it can work. Take it from one who knows.

The Yorkshire approach is to tell it like it is. The Geordie one is to keep quiet, and make people ask (beg?) you to pull them out of the shit you saw coming. We are a magnanimous lot us Geordies. Same result different approach. Result is if you know what you are doing, over time, people will recognise that.

Culture comes from Leadership. If people can weasle and whine. They will. If they are committed to the team, larger team, organisation, then they will be on board.

Remove the toxic, and nurture the positive.


And keep smiling! Trust me, it helps with everything.

O.x
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YorkshirePudding
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Sat Feb 13, 2010 11:59 am

Hi Olitil – Absolutely spot on with your comments. Leadership is the key.

As a Contractor/Consultant (gun for hire), dealing with the Processes, Partners, and Products is a piece of cake (generally). Dealing with the People aspects (meaning the culture) of an organisation is ALWAYS the biggest challenge.

One of the biggest difficulties when operating as a Contractor/Consultant is that rarely do you have the power to directly change an organisations culture, You can only offer your advice, supported by real-world examples of the opportunities, possibilities and their benefits The best that you can hope for is that the “Leader” you are assigned to: is receptive, believes in your project, trusts your advice, listens to the guidance and acts accordingly to achieve that best result for their masters, and above all else – is prepared to challenge the existing culture in the interest of the project when necessary.

Such a Leader is far more valuable to an organisation than any tools, software, methodologies or practices that the organisation owns/adopts. These are the inspirational types who recognise opportunity, who can turn an organisation around and make that real difference to efficiency and the bottom-line.

Give me a true “Leader” to work with and anything becomes possible.

Give me a “jobs-worth” Leader and I can virtually guarantee that the project will quickly become shelf-ware and will most likely be re-visited/re-applied a couple of years down the line.

Good News for Contractors & Vendors as it guarantees a steady repetitive workstreamI/cash-cow to be milked – Not good news for those of us with professional ethics who simply want to get a job done properly.
it is also a fair bet that the same “jobs-worth” will still be there, doing what they have always done, and waiting for the redundancy or early retirement option to come along.

Nett benefit to the organisation……Zilch !

I will keep smiling, as you advise, and will keep the faith.

As you Geordies say “Many a mickle maks a muckle” or is it “ When the boat comes in ….”
As we in Yorkshire say “Where there’s muck there’s brass”
Not sure what Scousers say….but they probably nicked it off someone else anyway :D
Best Regards,
Terry
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