i need help and tips for an interview plz

Forum for job seekers and employers in the ITIL arena.
Post Reply
User avatar
ghass13
Newbie
Newbie
Posts: 4
Joined: Tue Oct 13, 2009 8:00 pm

Wed Oct 14, 2009 6:13 am

plz help me if u can and advice will be avilable and my story
is i applyed for this job last month and i made an exam last weel which i prepeared for by studying ITILv3 the question for the test was hard because it was about cases u should make a plans or actions so it was hard test cuase it was how to implement the thinking on cases

now i have an interview next week and i know now that the interview will be also on the way how to think to solve problems not technical interview so i assume that it will be like the test question about cases and situations so how can i prepeare my self well for such an interview because this job means alot for me plz any help will be great thank you


User avatar
Diarmid
ITIL Expert
ITIL Expert
Posts: 1894
Joined: Mon Mar 03, 2008 7:00 pm
Location: Helensburgh

Wed Oct 14, 2009 6:58 am

The best way to tackle such situations is to draw on your own experience. Stay calm and think how you have solved problems in real life. Analyse the question and understand what is really needed.

The reason for such questions is to see if the candidates have experience and capability for solving problems. If you find the questions too challenging then perhaps you are not yet ready for such a role.
"Method goes far to prevent trouble in business: for it makes the task easy, hinders confusion, saves abundance of time, and instructs those that have business depending, both what to do and what to hope."
William Penn 1644-1718
User avatar
ghass13
Newbie
Newbie
Posts: 4
Joined: Tue Oct 13, 2009 8:00 pm

Wed Oct 14, 2009 9:31 am

Diarmid wrote:The best way to tackle such situations is to draw on your own experience. Stay calm and think how you have solved problems in real life. Analyse the question and understand what is really needed.

The reason for such questions is to see if the candidates have experience and capability for solving problems. If you find the questions too challenging then perhaps you are not yet ready for such a role.
thank you for the advice,i am a problem solver by nature but the problem is that problems need thinking and thinking needs time in such an interview u have to think fast and answer right i think the elements in the answer and the way u think in such alittle time if u can give me to answer if i was asked for a plan or actions or a soluation for a case what is the basic elements they expect to hear in such answers?

thank you so much ahead
User avatar
mnsmith
ITIL Expert
ITIL Expert
Posts: 109
Joined: Sun Mar 30, 2008 8:00 pm
Location: North West England

Wed Oct 14, 2009 9:56 am

Here another bit of advise for you. Think about what you are saying before you say it.

It's very difficult to read your posts above because you use no punctuation so your sentences just go on and on and on and on. To me this makes me think that you have a lot of information in your head that you want to write in the post and it just came out in one go without any thought on what is actually being written. If you used a similar style in your interview you are likely to alienate the interviewers by going on and on and on and on answering a single point and the odds are you'll end up talking too much around the subject and you won't answer the question.

Of course, I'm no expert and have only deduced my thought from a couple of posts on an informal forum. In fact, it could just be that you full stop key is broken.

Anyway, good luck for the interview.

Mick
Mick Smith
Change, Configuration and Release Manager
User avatar
UKVIKING
ITIL Expert
ITIL Expert
Posts: 3639
Joined: Fri Sep 15, 2006 8:00 pm
Location: London, UK

Wed Oct 14, 2009 9:58 am

An interview is not where you aretasked to solve a problem

what they are looking for usually is as follows

Do you meet the qualifications for the job ?
Do you have the interest and personality for the job
Can you articulate and form the following

an answer to a question - the answer actually provides the information to the question
an answer in complete sentance or a complete thought

The ability to think
The ability to reason
to learn from pas t mistakes - and explain why

I always liked to ask for specific roles - the most stupid thing the person ever did, what did they learn from and how would they react if someone did the same
John Hardesty
ITSM Manager's Certificate (Red Badge)

Change Management is POWER & CONTROL. /....evil laughter
User avatar
ghass13
Newbie
Newbie
Posts: 4
Joined: Tue Oct 13, 2009 8:00 pm

Wed Oct 14, 2009 10:13 am

UKVIKING wrote:An interview is not where you aretasked to solve a problem

what they are looking for usually is as follows

Do you meet the qualifications for the job ?
Do you have the interest and personality for the job
Can you articulate and form the following

an answer to a question - the answer actually provides the information to the question
an answer in complete sentance or a complete thought

The ability to think
The ability to reason
to learn from pas t mistakes - and explain why

I always liked to ask for specific roles - the most stupid thing the person ever did, what did they learn from and how would they react if someone did the same
thank you so much that is exactly what i am trying to do or i will try to do think reasonable, and answer reasnoble?
you told me what i should do, but can i you tell me what i shouldnt do in such a situation?
thank you all
User avatar
TomOzITIL_2
ITIL Expert
ITIL Expert
Posts: 128
Joined: Wed May 13, 2009 8:00 pm

Wed Oct 14, 2009 6:45 pm

[quote="ghass13
thank you so much that is exactly what i am trying to do or i will try to do think reasonable, and answer reasnoble?
you told me what i should do, but can i you tell me what i shouldnt do in such a situation?
thank you all[/quote]

UKV's advice is very sound.

Some "Don'ts" for an interview:
* Talk about your previous employers negatively.
* Avoid eye contact.
* Display zero personality/sense of humour.
* Panic - if you need time to think about the question or scenario, say "that is a good question", give me a moment to gather my thoughts.
* Be afraid to ask questions. Good candidates can ask bright intelligent questions.
* Be afraid of silence. If you've answered the question, allow the person interviewing you time to assimilate what you've said.
* Turn up under-dressed - wear a suit & tie to interviews for ALL office-based IT jobs. Well presented, tie tied properly, shirt pressed, shoes clean.
* Lie - you might land the job but it will proibably catch up with you eventually
* Display bad manners - shake hands (properly, not like a cold fish), don't interrupt, curse, run late
* Be afraid to say "I don't know the answer to that", but here is how I would go about finding the answer.
* Avoid giving specific examples.
* Avoid expressing your experience in terms that relate to business value (service up, costs down, agility up, compliance up). eg: I helped improve service desk responsiveness from XX to YY which meant that customer satisfaction surveys went from AA to BB and the reputation of the IT Dept went from XX to YY.
* Overstate your experience/role in whatever you're doing. If your experience was a small role in a big or complex initiative, don't say you led the thing, or else a smart interviewer will find you out. Explain what you did and what you learnt.
* Compromise your values/ethics (assuming they are strong :) ). If an interviewer leads you down a path where you might say something you don't actually believe in, stop before you say something you regret.
User avatar
ghass13
Newbie
Newbie
Posts: 4
Joined: Tue Oct 13, 2009 8:00 pm

Thu Oct 15, 2009 2:35 pm

TomOzITIL_2 wrote:[quote="ghass13
thank you so much that is exactly what i am trying to do or i will try to do think reasonable, and answer reasnoble?
you told me what i should do, but can i you tell me what i shouldnt do in such a situation?
thank you all
UKV's advice is very sound.

Some "Don'ts" for an interview:
* Talk about your previous employers negatively.
* Avoid eye contact.
* Display zero personality/sense of humour.
* Panic - if you need time to think about the question or scenario, say "that is a good question", give me a moment to gather my thoughts.
* Be afraid to ask questions. Good candidates can ask bright intelligent questions.
* Be afraid of silence. If you've answered the question, allow the person interviewing you time to assimilate what you've said.
* Turn up under-dressed - wear a suit & tie to interviews for ALL office-based IT jobs. Well presented, tie tied properly, shirt pressed, shoes clean.
* Lie - you might land the job but it will proibably catch up with you eventually
* Display bad manners - shake hands (properly, not like a cold fish), don't interrupt, curse, run late
* Be afraid to say "I don't know the answer to that", but here is how I would go about finding the answer.
* Avoid giving specific examples.
* Avoid expressing your experience in terms that relate to business value (service up, costs down, agility up, compliance up). eg: I helped improve service desk responsiveness from XX to YY which meant that customer satisfaction surveys went from AA to BB and the reputation of the IT Dept went from XX to YY.
* Overstate your experience/role in whatever you're doing. If your experience was a small role in a big or complex initiative, don't say you led the thing, or else a smart interviewer will find you out. Explain what you did and what you learnt.
* Compromise your values/ethics (assuming they are strong :) ). If an interviewer leads you down a path where you might say something you don't actually believe in, stop before you say something you regret.[/quote]


thank you all for such a help i will try my best to do ur advices wish me luck
User avatar
TomOzITIL_2
ITIL Expert
ITIL Expert
Posts: 128
Joined: Wed May 13, 2009 8:00 pm

Sun Oct 18, 2009 10:09 pm

One final thing, especially if you're beginning your career, is to be clever when it comes to salary negotiation. You might want an extra 20% salary but the company may play hardball and say no.

Instead, consider asking for as much training as possible. They might not want to pay you an extra few thousand dollars, but might be willing to invest that sort of money (or even more) in training & certification for you.

Try your best to think medium/longer term. With more certification under your belt and practical success & experience (and your employer seeing your good work ethic), the money often starts to take care of itself.
User avatar
aucade
Senior Itiler
Senior Itiler
Posts: 50
Joined: Mon Dec 15, 2008 7:00 pm

Tue Oct 20, 2009 1:30 pm

@TomOzITIL_2
Avoid eye contact.
Is this a cultural thing in Australia? Avoiding eye contact in Germany could be interpreted as "having low-esteem", "not being sure" or "just hiding or lying about something". My guess is in Australia it`s taken more as a threat.

Steve
User avatar
UKVIKING
ITIL Expert
ITIL Expert
Posts: 3639
Joined: Fri Sep 15, 2006 8:00 pm
Location: London, UK

Tue Oct 20, 2009 3:21 pm

Aucade

I think you mis read that

He said things you should not do

Avoid Eye Contact is one


DThis does not mean stare the interviewer down. Bu look at him or her
John Hardesty
ITSM Manager's Certificate (Red Badge)

Change Management is POWER & CONTROL. /....evil laughter
User avatar
aucade
Senior Itiler
Senior Itiler
Posts: 50
Joined: Mon Dec 15, 2008 7:00 pm

Wed Oct 21, 2009 1:44 pm

Ups. It helps sometimes being able to read. ;-)
Post Reply