incident workflow

General discussion on all aspects of the IT Infrastructure Library (ITIL)
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iori
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Fri Aug 29, 2014 10:47 am

Hi all,
I need a bit of help with how an incident is handled within ITIL.Suppose that an organization has problems with servers outside office hours and the technical team would be alerted by an auotmated message.

From ITIL point of view how this incident would be classified? as a major incident ?

Thank for your help.


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UKVIKING
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Sat Aug 30, 2014 3:18 am

go read the itil books then
John Hardesty
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iori
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Tue Sep 02, 2014 6:31 am

I read the books. It's hard for me to understand without a concrete example. They are dray and abstract.
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iori
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Tue Sep 02, 2014 6:37 am

I apologise for misspeling. I meant that the books are dry and abstract. They don't have any good example. I understand better if I would have a concrete example how an unplanned event it's handled. How they categorize it, what they did, stuff like that.

Example:

" Saturday at 9am, the team was notified that something went wrong with the system. ..etc "

They don't have any short stories like that. Maybe you could recommend me some book which also includes short stories, examples like that?

It would be easier for me to understand.

Thank you.
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UKVIKING
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Tue Sep 02, 2014 1:54 pm

Iori

You are so correct in that the books are dry, abstract and well not very boring. However, training course - classroom - usually provide lot of examples by the instructors / students

First, are you in the IT Industry working at the moment ?

First an incident is basically when the agreed delivered service is not being delivery exactly as agreed. This means that the service is not doing what it is suppose to do

Example: email service is a 24 hours. If it is not working, it is an incident

It may also be a Major incident - depending on the number of users impacted.

A Major incident is one that has a Major impact to the business during its service hours.

For example

Payroll systems
crashed the day before pay is processed - major
crashed the day after and the next is 30 days away - normal

Your example is just an incident (event) and when the office opens the next business day, then it is a incident maybe even bordering on major - depending on what it does
John Hardesty
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Change Management is POWER & CONTROL. /....evil laughter
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iori
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Thu Sep 04, 2014 7:43 am

Hi
thanks for your reply.
No, I am not working in IT industry. I am taking my Master degree at a IT University and the topic of our thesis( I work with another student) includes ITIL, as well. Practically we want to make a comparison between our University which doesn't use ITIL and companies that use ITIL. We would like to illustrate this with small case stories about what happens exactly. At our University many students and even teachers have no idea about ITIL or what is it. We contacted two big companies who are using ITIL, and they promised us some case stories but until now we didn't get anything( maybe we didn't make them interested enough, we tried our best) .

I found it hard for me to make an analysis or a comparison of a specific incident with ITIL. How the incident would have been handled if ITIL would have been used. I have a general idea and I understand but not very good. I would understand it so much better if I would have examples of incidents that were handled from ITIL point of view.
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UKVIKING
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Sat Sep 06, 2014 12:41 pm

Iori,

I think you need to rethink your thesis with ITIl.

First. IT service management is the discipline / body of processes etc about managing a company's IT assets.

IT SM has been around since there were companies with IT assets. It is not a new concept. The IT SM in the 30/40s when the first mainframes were built, implemented and managed had its own policies, processes, procedures and work instructions.

When I worked for BBN on the Arpanet / Milnet infrastructure, we had all of the processes that have been documented in ITIL / ISO 20000. I worked in the Service Desk (Network Operations Centre) before I moved to be the 2nd Change Manager for Arpanet / Milnet in 1985.

All ITIL has done is make the terminology. flows, etc in a normative means so that the concepts become a defacto / de jure standard body of practice.

A company can do IT SM well with out ever having any staff taking any ITIL courses or certification.
Likewise, a company can have all the staff in the company certified at the highest level in ITIL and still have a terrible IT SM process set.

However, one of the problems / benefits of ITIL is that it is a framework which can be molded to fit each company within reason while keeping true to the core definitions

Incidents occur when the service that is being delivered by the IT asset is not delivering the correct level of service - quality, time, etc

For some companies, the presumption is that if they get a tool that is ITIL certified, then that is all that they need to do.

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John Hardesty
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Change Management is POWER & CONTROL. /....evil laughter
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