Service Design - Introducing new service

General discussion on all aspects of the IT Infrastructure Library (ITIL)
Post Reply
ITILDave
Newbie
Newbie
Posts: 1
Joined: Mon Nov 16, 2020 7:19 am

Mon Nov 16, 2020 7:39 am

Hi - New to ITIL . I have to introduce new IT service using Service Design cycle however I am bit confused .
How do the 4 P's and the 5 aspects of Service design interact ?
Anybody know where I can see a working live example including documents ( ie SDP) of introducing a new service ?
Thanks for any help :D


User avatar
Corde Wagner
Senior Itiler
Senior Itiler
Posts: 41
Joined: Fri Nov 10, 2006 7:00 pm
Location: El Dorado Hills, California
Contact:

Tue Nov 17, 2020 6:49 pm

Good questions ITILDave, I’m going answer them in separate posts because the answers to each question are very long. (My apologies if it’s too much information, but hey, you asked)

It’s my take that the 4ps and five aspects of design are ITIL v2011 concepts are offered to design teams as a way to ensure that a holistic approach is taken for all service design activities and to ensure consistency and integration within all activities and processes across IT. I recommend that you combine and integrate both concepts into your design practice as a way to ensure that your team(s) consider all possible aspects when designing the new or to be changed service. Obviously the activities of both concepts can be check offs in the service design package (SDP) but they certainly should also be included in all of your end-to-end design activities.

For what it’s worth, ITIL4 has what I believe to be an improved approach to design of a service. The ITIL4 Design practice includes service design aspects that I believe combine the ITIL v2011 concepts you are asking about, in an updated and more understandable way.

It sounds like you have a very important job and from my own experience, what you are looking to do is very complex. If you have not already taken the ITIL v3 courses, and short of telling you to read both the ITIL v2011 Service Strategy book and the Service Design book (I have and you should), I highly (HIGHLY!) recommend you invest time in learning the ITIL via official courses. I personally took ITIL v3 courses and ITIL4 courses from GoGoTraining.com and can without hesitation recommend the courses in large part because Suzanne Van Hove is the instructor of those courses. At a minimum the ITIL v3 Foundations and then the ITIL Service Design courses would be very helpful for your journey. The ITIL v4 will also be helpful but ITIL4 does not yet offer an equivalent course to the ITIL v3 Service Design course.

I hope this helps, but if not, let me know what other questions you have.

Corde
Corde Wagner
ITIL 4 Managing Professional - ITIL v3 Expert - v2 Red Badge - VeriSM-Plus - Certified Agile Service Manager
User avatar
Corde Wagner
Senior Itiler
Senior Itiler
Posts: 41
Joined: Fri Nov 10, 2006 7:00 pm
Location: El Dorado Hills, California
Contact:

Tue Nov 17, 2020 7:35 pm

ITILDave,

Over the past 20 years I have worked in companies that have developed their own software and systems, which would include the design, build, transition to operations and operational support.

With regards to your request for real examples of an SDP, I believe the short answer is that you will be hard pressed to find real examples. This is because real SDPs have company private/sensitive information that no company should have out on the internet or should share with outsiders.

That said, many of us who believe the ITIL best practices are ‘best’ for a reason, believe that the outline of the SDP provided by ITILv3 are very good. The idiom that comes to mind when it comes to deciding if you would create your own list of what’s in an SDP, would be “why reinvent the wheel”?

I recommend then that you get a copy of the ITIL Service Design Package example in the book (DM me or do an online search), form a working group of others in your design project, and together put definitions to all of the items in your SDP. If one doesn't exist, offer up your SDP to become your “standard” and make it available for others in your organization who will need to design a service.

If you are not the design practice lead, you should recommend that a role be created so that you're the last person in your org having to invent (reinvent) the same process you are looking at. Have that role take your standardized STP, then put a solid feedback loop into the use of the SDP and wrap it into a set schedule for making process/practice improvements. The practice lead may also want to design and standardize on how requirements for a new or changed service are provided by the business. It’s my experience that requirements are generally awful until that is formalized and therefore the design/build are basically guesses as what the software/system is supposed to look like, etc.

I hope this helps and if not, please let me know if there are other questions ways I might be able to help in your effort.

Corde
Corde Wagner
ITIL 4 Managing Professional - ITIL v3 Expert - v2 Red Badge - VeriSM-Plus - Certified Agile Service Manager
Post Reply