How prevalent is a Process Improvement group in companies?

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fillsee226
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Fri Sep 04, 2009 6:02 pm

I'm a certified PM interested in moving into the process arena. I've gotten the Foundations Certification and it has peaked my interest. Do many companies cull out this area? If so, what name would the "group" be referenced? How are those groups typically organized (hierarchy)? I'd appreciate any suggestions on how to research if companies are serious about implementing ITIL.


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thechosenone69
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Sun Sep 06, 2009 9:58 am

Fill,

ITIL has been adopted by hundreds of organisations worldwide. Companies like: IBM, Microsoft, HP, British Airways and plenty more.

Try to read the "Planning to Implement Service Management" Book and see if it helps.

regards,

A
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TomOzITIL_2
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Thu Sep 10, 2009 8:07 pm

Some organisations invest in Process Improvement groups. I'm the Business Improvement & Process manager for a Gov shared ICT services provider with 5 staff. We also have a Service Mgt group with 10 people (Major Incident Mgrs, Enterprise Problem & Change etc).

We have 320 staff in total and are growing to 600+ over the next 3 years to bring our installed base from 12000 to 55000 seats.

The thing is that process improvement is just a part of CSI generally. I'm also concerned with other dimensions like Leadership, Culture, People (competencies), Technologies (tooling) and lastly Processes.

Everything we do has some sort of business case attached to it so investment in CSI is almost "self-funding". Hacking cost out of your operation due to GFC is a short-sighted thing to do - not to say that companies don't do this, but in the public sector we are somewhat insulated from short-term financial constraints, plus Australia's economy is one of few that is coping OK with the GFC.

So, yes, these types of groups exist but need to constantly justify their existence by producing tangible, measurable benefits - not just inmplementing ITIL for the sake of it.
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TomOzITIL_2
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Thu Sep 10, 2009 8:11 pm

PS:

Organisationally, I report to the Chief Operations Officer who reports to our CEO but spend my time evenly spread working with Client Engagement (Portfolio/Demand Mgt), our Strategy group, our Human Capital folks (HR), Service Transition (incl PMO) and Finance, as our Operations people.
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