Incident Management Policy - Incident Severity determination

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SubbuA
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Thu Apr 29, 2010 3:46 am

Hi All,

I need some assisting in defining Incident Management Policy on downgrade of an incident ticket (severity)

I am facing an issue here - I have close to 75 tickets downgraded from original severity level from the time of raising the incidet to before having the incident closed

I feel - there is something wrong, but before I question this, I am in need to rebute this with some strong policy statement on this line in allignment with ITIL v3

Please assist

Regards
Subbu A


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UKVIKING
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Thu Apr 29, 2010 7:55 am

SubbuA

I would recommend that part of the incident analysis process that the original priority, impact etc be reviewed to determine whether the incident is indeed at the correct priority.

This should be done with the acknowledgement / approval of the IM Mgr
John Hardesty
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Change Management is POWER & CONTROL. /....evil laughter
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SubbuA
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Fri Apr 30, 2010 9:29 am

Thanks John for your response...

Is it allowed to downgrade about 75 incidents per month orginally created as severity 1 or 2 to less severity.....

I suspect, this is happening to save incident management process from SLA misses.... they can justify the downgrade stating - that the time of incident being raisedit impact heavily...and as and when the incident was worked upon the impact started reducing and hence the downgrade..

is this allowed and is it the right way to deal with an Incident Ticket?
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swansong
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Fri Apr 30, 2010 12:54 pm

It is entirely right to have the facility to downgrade the incident severity.

In terms of your situation, downgrading 75 incidents per month if you only have 75 incidents per month is a bad thing. Downgrading 75 incidents per month, if you get 1 million incidents per month, is less of an issue.

However it is no bad thing to analyse each instance and determine the reasons why each was downgraded. This should be done as part of continual service improvement. If the motives for downgrading do not contribute to service improvement then I think you would probably be correct in your assumption that this was done for under hand reasons.

Incidentally, do you keep stats on the number of incidents which were upgraded to a higher severity? How many were upgraded during the same period?....
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SubbuA
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Wed May 05, 2010 9:10 am

Thanks for this preview

I just checked the ratio of incudents whose severity was upgraded to whose severity was downgraded

I see that most of the incidents were upgraded from sev 4 to sev 3

Amongst the tickets whose severity were changed, Only around 10% of the tickets downgraded and approx. 90% were upgraded

So a healthy sign I suppose

So now all i Need to do is understand, that over 3000 Incidents had change in priority last month which is provoking more analysis

I will dig into it

Thank you all
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UKVIKING
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Wed May 05, 2010 11:43 am

SubbuA

Not necessarily

Why were 90 % upgraded.. That smells of stacking the deck in order to use LDLaS to prove a point
John Hardesty
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