can I resolve not solved?

An open discussion on issues related directly or primarily to the service or help desk.
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danatwork
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Tue Jul 24, 2012 4:44 pm

If we have an incident that the issue is a known bug, and the developers or business has decided that they are not going to fix it (or will fix it in a release in a year or two), do you close the incident as Not Solved/Known Bug or such? Or do standard ITIL process suggest you must leave it open until there is a fix or workaround?

Thanks,
Dan


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Diarmid
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Wed Jul 25, 2012 2:18 pm

You may be confusing incident with problem here.

Incidents do not require to be solved. They require to be resolved. I.e. the user/customer must be enabled to proceed with their use of the service to do what they want or must be provided with (or use) an alternative means of achieving their requirement. If this does not happen then the incident has not been resolved and therefore remains open.

In the extreme case where the business has agreed to do without that facility for a period, then doing without is the workaround and that is what the user/customer will do each time they try to use this facility and it fails.
"Method goes far to prevent trouble in business: for it makes the task easy, hinders confusion, saves abundance of time, and instructs those that have business depending, both what to do and what to hope."
William Penn 1644-1718
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Boydness
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Thu Aug 09, 2012 8:24 am

danatwork wrote:If we have an incident that the issue is a known bug, and the developers or business has decided that they are not going to fix it (or will fix it in a release in a year or two), do you close the incident as Not Solved/Known Bug or such? Or do standard ITIL process suggest you must leave it open until there is a fix or workaround?

Thanks,
Dan
Dan,

As Diarmid stated, that incident should be attributed to a problem ticket and the information you gathered (as to why the Incident is occurring) should be a Known error entered into you Known Error database (KEDB). If there is a known approved workaround, you employ it and you close the Incident with a return to service.
You should continue to document the Incidents, reference the KEDB entry, and attribute to the problem management ticket/record. Your metrics for the volume and frequency of Incidents should be utilized to apply pressure to developers/business to expedite the solution, especially if the impact to business is great or is increasing over time.
Your argument is that the unresolved problem continues to create the situation were you continue to expend Incident handling resources and incur impacts to the Business ($). Obviously, it is was resolved you would be utilizing less resources and improving the functionality of Business.

If your leadership has accepted that the problem will continue for the foreseeable future, your metrics should ensure that they are continuing to make an informed decision and that the severity is to the level that they understand and is not increasing. A great many of the time the severity is downplayed and/or something changes that increases the severity at some point.

How often do you plan to discuss these unresolved problems with your leadership? Weekly, Bi-weekly, monthly?


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KenLuo
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Sat Nov 17, 2012 10:24 am

strange, known issue with no resolution? also no workaround? no automated workaround?

you cannot let team do manual restore each time.
Luo, Tian-Hong (Ken)
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UKVIKING
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Sat Nov 17, 2012 12:08 pm

Ken,

Why not?

Incident management is concerned with the restoration of service as soon as possible

If the underlying cause costs a large chuck of money and will take 6 months to implement... is the service to be down for 6 months or even 1 day

If IM does its responsibility, the service is kept running while it is fixed in the background... that is if it can be
John Hardesty
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Change Management is POWER & CONTROL. /....evil laughter
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