how to sort incidents according to their priority?

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WNejla
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Tue Feb 05, 2013 8:59 am

Hi,
I m doing a project about incident management according to ITIL V3, I know that impact and urgency are used to assign the priority, but i haven't understand how can i sort incidents according to their priorities, ca you help me please?
thanks :roll:


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Diarmid
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Tue Feb 05, 2013 9:11 am

resource go into the incidents starting with the highest priority down until you run out of resources. When an incident is resolved the resources are used for the next highest incident.
"Method goes far to prevent trouble in business: for it makes the task easy, hinders confusion, saves abundance of time, and instructs those that have business depending, both what to do and what to hope."
William Penn 1644-1718
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WNejla
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Tue Feb 05, 2013 1:43 pm

thank you for your reply,
I need more precision, for example how can i compare an incident which has a medium urgence and a high impact with another incident having a high urgence and a medium impact? I hope that you have understand what i mean
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Diarmid
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Tue Feb 05, 2013 7:01 pm

It is not an exact science because you do not have all day to work out priorities.

If you are using a simple algorithm they would both be, say, B priority. If you do not have the resources to work on both at once equally, then in each case I would ask "how medium" and "how high?" and make a judgement on the spot. If practical, involve an appropriate business manager in the decision.

More precision can be achieved by using more discriminating scales. For example: low, fairly low, medium, fairly high, high. But the cost is needing more detailed knowledge to get it right. That takes more time.
"Method goes far to prevent trouble in business: for it makes the task easy, hinders confusion, saves abundance of time, and instructs those that have business depending, both what to do and what to hope."
William Penn 1644-1718
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