Example of Problem SLA / Priority

Discussion on issues related directly or largely to ITIL problem management.
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fulhamn
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Mon Jan 21, 2013 10:00 am

Are the metrics / SLA below a good indication to get a problem resolved. Or is the metric below related to the incident ticket? Can the SLA'S assigned to an incident be the same for resolving a Problem ?

How can you put a time line on getting a problem resolved?

o (Very High) up to 1 Day
 Multiple Incidents to critical Business System or infrastructure
 No workaround identified
 No Root Cause available

o (High) up to 3 days
 Multiple Incidents to critical Business System or infrastructure
 Workaround identified to restore service
 Root Cause not available

o (medium) up to 5 days
 Multiple Incidents to Business System or infrastructure
 Workaround identified to restore service.
 Root Cause Available

o (Low) Over 5 days
 Non-service impacting, workaround in place with Root Cause available


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UKVIKING
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Mon Jan 21, 2013 3:16 pm

Fulhamm

As Incident Management is to resolve the incident and restore the service a SLA is used to determine how quick the service is restored against what would be the norm for fixing that type - classification - of an incident

However, Problem management is about finding the cause of the incident - which may takes days. weeks months years or never

SLAs is not recommended then
John Hardesty
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Change Management is POWER & CONTROL. /....evil laughter
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KenLuo
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Tue Jan 22, 2013 1:07 am

Resolving problems is a bit complicated then restoring service, as you might need to work with different support teams or even vendors.

So a definitive SLA for problem management is quite difficult.

But we do track the problem with an aggressive way if it causes a severity 1 or severity 2 issues, e.g. system downtime, performance degradation:
1) We need update every day initially until a clear and detailed follow-up plan is in place.
2) And then we need update every week to check the progress.
3) If the issue happens again, we'll then change the weekly meeting to daily meeting with incident / problem support on the same call.
Luo, Tian-Hong (Ken)
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fulhamn
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Tue Jan 22, 2013 9:25 am

UKVIKING wrote:Fulhamm

As Incident Management is to resolve the incident and restore the service a SLA is used to determine how quick the service is restored against what would be the norm for fixing that type - classification - of an incident

However, Problem management is about finding the cause of the incident - which may takes days. weeks months years or never

SLAs is not recommended then
Agree, also company politics might come into consideration.
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